Massey is New Zealand’s leading university for all things food.

Our graduates built the New Zealand food industry. Massey is one of only a handful of universities outside the Americas that offers a food technology degree recognised by the US-based Institute of Food Technologists, so it’s the natural choice for your food technology qualification. International companies like Unilever have come to New Zealand to headhunt our food tech grads. You’ll study towards the:

This degree is one of the most well-regarded food-related qualifications in New Zealand.

The programme is really practical so you’ll get hands-on experience and make contacts in the food industry – which is really valuable when you come to look for a job!

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What is a career in food technology like?

If you want to come up with new taste sensations, new food products or ways of making safe and nutritious foods on an industrial scale, consider becoming a food technologist, food engineer or food scientist. You could work with production, technical and marketing managers, helping them to come up with relevant and practical solutions to product development, manufacturing, marketing, or… Read more

If you want to come up with new taste sensations, new food products or ways of making safe and nutritious foods on an industrial scale, consider becoming a food technologist, food engineer or food scientist.

You could work with production, technical and marketing managers, helping them to come up with relevant and practical solutions to product development, manufacturing, marketing, or high-tech packaging. You might be developing healthier foods for people with different nutritional needs, or foods that will help feed the world’s booming population.

Massey graduates have gone on to do a huge variety of thing including setting up their own brewery and food companies – including Hubbards cereal.

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Why Food Technology is awesome

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Path to your career in Food Technology

Food Technology Flow-chart
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HISTORY OF FOOD TECH

Humans have been manipulating and creating new food sources for thousands of years. Whether through cooking, preserving with salt and spices or ‘domesticating’ crops like rice, we’ve been trying to find new ways of feeding ourselves more efficiently. But it really is in the last hundred years, that food technology as we know it was developed. Processes like the invention… Read more

Humans have been manipulating and creating new food sources for thousands of years. Whether through cooking, preserving with salt and spices or ‘domesticating’ crops like rice, we’ve been trying to find new ways of feeding ourselves more efficiently.

But it really is in the last hundred years, that food technology as we know it was developed. Processes like the invention of canning in 1810, pasteurisation and refrigeration have revolutionised the provision of food to the world.

With the population of the world increasing, the need to develop new types of food, or ways of producing or processing existing food, has become even more urgent. People are also becoming more health conscious, more aware of nutrition and diet and the affect it has on their quality (and longevity) of life.

Nicolas Appert’s development in 1810 of the canning process was a decisive event, although at the time he wasn’t aware at the time of what an amazing impact it would have on being able to store food.

In 1864, another trailblazer was Louis Pasteur. You might know about his work with milk, we owe the fact that we can keep milk for a week or so down to the process of pasteurisation, which he invented. He developed a process of heating milk and milk products to destroy food spoilage and disease-producing organisms, But his first research project was one of the first scientific-based projects on food technology and looked at how to avoid spoilage of wine. Although he focussed on food, as a result of his research Pasteur became the pioneer into bacteriology and of modern preventive medicine.

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NEXT STEPS

Make sure you’ve got the correct university entrance qualifications. To study food technology you’ll need the following subjects: Required subjects Mathematics  Physics  Chemistry  School To study food technology, you’ll need to achieve 16 or more credits at NCEA Level 3 in physics and mathematics and 14 more credits at NCEA Level 3 in chemistry. Mature students If you’re not a… Read more

Make sure you’ve got the correct university entrance qualifications.

To study food technology you’ll need the following subjects:

Required subjects

  • Mathematics 
  • Physics 
  • Chemistry 

School

To study food technology, you’ll need to achieve 16 or more credits at NCEA Level 3 in physics and mathematics and 14 more credits at NCEA Level 3 in chemistry.

Mature students

If you’re not a school leaver, and do not have the necessary science papers, you can sit papers at summer school in:

  • Methods of Mathematics
  • Foundation of Physics
  • Introductory Chemistry

Distance learning

You cannot study food technology by distance learning.

Download Your Guide to Sciences, Agriculture and Engineering

Find out how to take the next step.