Paul Spoonley

Distinguished Professor, Massey University

In 2036, New Zealand will look very different.

While there will still be hoards of sheep and a handful of kiwis – Auckland will be bigger, the New Zealand population would have significantly increased, there’ll be a soar in the Asian population and every region in the country will be more multi-cultural.

That’s according to Professor Paul Spoonley. His work could have a huge impact on you, and how you live in the New Zealand of the future.

His work in sociology is internationally renowned. He is a regular speaker internationally; he’s written 28 books (many of which are used as resources in New Zealand universities, and around the world), and, most importantly for YOU, he’s also being paid to predict what the New Zealand will be like in 24 years, so the government can plan for it.

In the last twenty years new food options like sushi and wontons have become commonplace in New Zealand, you can hear new languages spoken on every street corner.

But why are they coming here? How will everyone get along? Will there be enough jobs for everyone? There could be up to 10 million people in our country in fifty years…

For years Paul has studied immigration in New Zealand and how we, as a country, can be better prepared for an influx of newcomers in the future.

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Passion For Sociology

As the director of research for the College of Humanities and Social Studies at Massey, Paul is internationally renowned for his work in sociology – which is about discovering the development, structure and functioning of human society and social problems.What started as a love for geography gradually turned into a passion for sociology when he opted to take a second…

As the director of research for the College of Humanities and Social Studies at Massey, Paul is internationally renowned for his work in sociology – which is about discovering the development, structure and functioning of human society and social problems.
What started as a love for geography gradually turned into a passion for sociology when he opted to take a second major when he was younger.

He has written 28 books on topics such as ethnic relations and identity, political extremism and employment. Many of his books are used as textbooks and resources in universities throughout New Zealand and the rest of the world.
He has received many accolades over the years for his work, and last year he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.